Corey Schubert

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Corey Schubert
Producer of 2017 Official Selection “Remnants”

DG: What is your name and company URL?

CS: I’m Corey Schubert, and our production company is Escape Velocity Films. Our URL is escapevelocityaz.com — and all of our films are available to watch on the site for free!

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting?

CS: I’m a screenwriter first and foremost, and have also been having a fantastic time co-producing short films for the past five years.

DG: What are you currently working on?

CS: We’re doing two horror shorts this year, and I’m working on a treatment for a feature version of Remnants (a short that played at Shriekfest last year).

DG: Ooh, I’m excited about that! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

CS: I like to put a big emphasis on the “co-” in co-writing and co-producing, because I love the partnership involved in creating projects with talented people. I’d say my biggest mentors are my co-writer Eric Joel La Fuente and our director David Ugarte, because I learn a ton from them throughout the process every time.

DG: Why do you think the horror/sci-fi genres have such a large following?

CS: I just spent 10 minutes trying to come up with an answer that would make me sound wise, using words like “catharsis” and “metaphor for society’s fears.” But honestly, I think it just comes down to the simplicity of the fact that seeing a masked killer with a weedwhacker chase around a victim on screen is fun as all hell.

DG: LOL very true! What do you love most about this business?

CS: The absurdity that often results from making films on an ultra-low budget is fantastic. We buried a woman up to her neck in the Arizona desert in 110-degree heat and took shelter in a burned-out old meth lab for shade. Some guys came through shooting at cacti out of their truck windows at one point. That was just one day on set.

DG: Wow, that sounds like a horror film!! What do you dislike most about this business?

CS: “I love this idea, guys. Let’s make a movie! I’ll call you tomorrow and we’ll start moving this forward.” Then crickets. I absolutely understand the legit reasons of how and why that happens, but dang. Experiencing this enough times helped inspire me to co-produce, though, so maybe it’s ultimately a plus.

DG: I hear ya! Thatt is frustrating. What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

CS: We made our 16-minute short Remnants for about $2,000 — and people seem to really enjoy it. A lot of folks seem really surprised the budget was so low, which is a helluva compliment. We’re so honored to have been selected to play at Shriekfest among so many incredibly talented filmmakers! That’s honestly among our biggest accomplishments!

DG: I love that! Thank you! I was honored to have you guys there! I’m impressed with what you guys did for that amount of money! Any advice you’d like to give newbies?

CS: Be sure to put as much time into the story and script that you put into everything else involved in the production. Taking that extra time will make a huge difference for the cast, the crew and (most importantly) the audience.

DG: Great advice! Anything else you’d like to say?

CS: Thanks so much!

DG: Thank you Corey! It was great chatting!

Dan Robinette

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Dan Robinette
Director of 2017’s Official Selection “Tethered”

DG: What is your name and company URL?

DR: My name is Dan Robinette and I’m with 4 Leagues Media – www.4leaguesmedia.com

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting?

DR: i’m a Director in filmmaking and also work as a writer, sound designer and producer.

DG: What are you currently working on?

DR: Currently we’re juggling a few projects at 4 Leagues Media. Jeff Cox and I recently served as Executive Producers for our next short film The Black, which is Kayla Stuhr’s directorial debut – it’s currently in post-production. We’re in pre-production for our next short film, currently titled Nervous Breakdown, which I’ll be directing. We’re also working together to wrap up the feature screenplay for Tethered.

DG: Wow! You’ve been busy! A feature of Tethered? I’m so excited! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

DR: I don’t personally have a film mentor. I’ve found myself in that position for others around me.

DG: That’s really nice! Why do you think the horror/sci-fi genres have such a large following?

DR: I’m a big believer in cultivating one’s imagination and the horror / sci-fi genre often does just that. It often opens up doors or avenues which aren’t necessarily at the forefront of our minds. The genre film allows anyone to enter and be taken to a different world, or to experience a different myth. I think people gravitate towards that form of entertainment.

DG: I agree! What do you love most about this business?

DR: I love creating stories. It starts off in my head, then needs to be translated to paper and finally to the screen. Being part of that process with a group, then seeing it come to fruition at the end is the greatest part for me.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

DR: Preconceived notions about “how” things should be done – be it from a timing, financial or technical perspective. I would rather see more evolution and open-mindedness in the industry on how some of these filmmaking goals can be achieved instead of a pre-determined set of steps.

DG: I hear ya! It is frustrating. What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

DR: I’m probably most proud of the general success and attention that our last short film, Tethered, has garnered thus far.

DG: Any advice you’d like to give newbies?

DR: Stay committed to your craft (be it writing or filmmaking or both) and multi-task. As you’re writing, brainstorm new ideas. As you’re shooting, think of the next film. Move on to the next project as soon as you’ve wrapped up the last one!

DG: Great advice! Anything else you’d like to say?

DR: Don’t lose the rope! 😉 #TETHERED

DG: LOL! Love that film! Thank you Dan! It was great chatting!

David E. Munz-Maire

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

David E. Munz-Maire
2015 Official Selection “Chateau Sauvignon: Terroir”

DG: What is your name and company URL?

DM: David E. Munz-Maire (D. M. ‘Night’ Maire) and I co-founded AireBedd, a production company based out of New York City focusing on short form content. Here are my plugs:
– website: https://www.airebedd.com
– vimeo: https://vimeo.com/airebedd
– facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AireBedd/

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting?

DM: My specialty is storytelling. My passion is directing. My focus is producing.

DG: What are you currently working on?

DM: Currently, I am in development on Andrew Edison’s (director of Kevin Smith’s Bindlestiffs) second feature film, my first, with principal photography scheduled for early Summer. This untitled feature project will merge found footage and film noire to craft a comedic thriller that follows Steve, who, after the disappearance of his year-long girlfriend, is swept into a whirlwind of mystery and must sacrifice everything to uncover the truth about the love of his life. Also, I am in pre-production on Brian Blum’s next short film tentatively titled ‘Yoshiko-Chan’, which is slated to go into production in late March in Miami. Off the success of his last short film, ‘Blood and Water’, this based-on-true-events story explores the personal and cultural shame a Japanese mother associates with having an autistic child. Otherwise, I oversee the festival submissions for several short films I produced, including two of our most recent productions – an 8min neo-noire entitled “The Hobbyist” and “Mariposas” a super short (3min) which lives more in the fantastical genre.

DG: Wow! You’ve been busy! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

DM: To be determined.

DG: Why do you think the horror/sci-fi genres have such a large following?

DM: The simplest and most basic reason to me is because they’re fun, and being spooked can be a thrill. Moreover, the exploration of the unknown allows the viewers’ minds to wonder beyond the event horizon of consciousness, into the abyss, and stumble through the darkness of their innermost repressions. The horror/sci-fi genres transports us to wild places like mental asylums and blackholes, allowing its viewers to explore their fears and the unknown (often conjointly), all from the comfort of their seats. Film, as with all art, should be cathartic, and the horror/sci-fi genres are deeply purgative viewing experiences, as audience members will inevitably come out the other side unscathed, laughing off the chills with the rest of the crowd as they leave the theater.

DG: Yes! What do you love most about this business?

DM: The communal aspect of the filmmaking is one of my favorite parts of the business. Having all of these creative minds with their varying experiences assimilate to create something that can move the masses is inspiring. My upbringing was extremely cosmopolitan, and having been fortunate enough to sample dozens of cultures, I formed my worldly perspective which allows me to be adept at working with people from all walks of life, open minded when confronted with new ideas, and inventive when tackling creative problem solving. Traveling has allowed me to realize that there is not just one way of doing things, and, in the end, we all have the same needs and wants, so it makes more sense to work together. Zealous to continue discovering what our planet and its inhabitants have to offer, I also love that the cinematic medium will allow me to persevere in this quest by discovering new parts of the globe.

DG: Well said! What do you dislike most about this business?

DM: Hands down, I dislike how much money it takes to get a project off the ground. Making (good) movies continues to be the most expensive art form, even in this digital age.

DG: I hear ya! It is frustrating. What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

DM: ‘Chateau Sauvignon: terroir’, the last short I wrote and directed, will be ending its festival run later in 2019 after being on the circuit for over 3 years. To date, it has garnered over 250 official selections from film festivals world over, and accumulated more than 100 awards and 100 additional nominations.

DG: Wow! that is impressive! It’s a great film, well deserved! Any advice you’d like to give newbies?

DM: Respect and trust the people you hire and work with; they are in the creative trenches with you, and their goal is to achieve your vision. Also, perseverance is key. In all aspects of production, and your career. Don’t give up, whether its finding the patience to re-write draft after draft of your first short film until ‘it works’, submitting project after project to a festival until your dozenth short film finally receives that coveted award, or pitching investor after investor until your first feature is green lit. Crafting a strong portfolio is essential as a freelance creative, and demonstrating progression of quality is as important as developing a distinct aesthetic style. To this end, mistakes are inevitable, so make them often and early on through creation and experimentation, as they will be invaluable learning opportunities. Make Art.

DG: Great advice! Anything else you’d like to say?

DM: Peep these short promotional videos I co-directed and produced for Nothing More’s most recent album ‘The Stories We Tell Ourselves’:
– ‘Engagement’ (https://www.instagram.com/p/BaZ6HprhXCx/?hl=en&taken-by=nothingmoremusic)
– ‘The Note’ (https://www.instagram.com/p/BbAbW7QhIW1/?taken-by=nothingmoremusic)
– ‘Stick n Carrot’ (https://www.instagram.com/p/Bbh-D0KhSoJ/?taken-by=nothingmoremusic)

DG: Thank you David! It was great chatting!

Darren Callahan

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Darren Callahan
2012/2016 semi-finalist, 2017 semi-finalist & finalist

DG: What is your name and company URL?

DC: Darren Callahan
http://darrencallahan.com
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darren_Callahan
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1859933/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting?

DC: I’m mostly known as a writer, but I have also directed and scored films.

DG: What are you currently working on?

DC: BATTERY FILMTEXT has been releasing my screenplays as paperbacks as part of a series. Twelve volumes are out now and eight more release this year. (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=darren+callahan+collected)
I’ve also signed-on to score LVRS, directed by Emily Bennett, and a giallo by Ward Crockett entitled ALL THE FLOWERS THAT CUT THROUGH THE EARTH, both for 2018.

DG: Wow! Both Shriekfest friends! You’ve been busy! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

DC: So many have given me a boost throughout the years. It’s tough to name a single individual. Groups like Chicago Dramatists, led by the late Russ Tutterow, or Twilight Tales, a now-defunct genre series in Chicago, give you more sometimes than one person. I’m in the unfortunate position that no one with big power has really helped me directly (agents or lawyers just formalize stuff I’ve already brought to them). Raymond Benson (DIE ANOTHER DAY, THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH) has championed my work to others, as have a few producers and directors. Sadly, my artistic mentors are not accessible to me. David Cronenberg just isn’t returning my calls!

DG: LOL Nor mine. 🙂 Why do you think the horror/sci-fi genres have such a large following?

DC: When done right, horror says more about the human condition than any other art form. The sub-genre variety is greater and the urgency more palpable. Plus, people like something with history. No matter where you start in the genre, there is something before to trace back to and enjoy.
For sci-fi, it is similar to horror, though it tends to be less cynical, which is a relief. I’m not counting dystopian films, of course; they, too, can enlighten and entertain, even when depressing as hell. But nothing stops a great space adventure, such as STAR WARS.
I also really enjoy stories that blend the two genres, such as ALIEN, MONSTERS, or TIMECRIMES.

DG: Me too! What do you love most about this business?

DC: The little wins are nice. And it really does turn on a dime. Plus, I love meeting people who are interesting and fun to be around.

DG: That is so very true! What do you dislike most about this business?

DC: Today, very few decisions are made without the marketing department. And marketing will not sign up for something unless there is already an audience. For example, no band today will get a record deal unless they already have one million hits on a self-produced video. Period. It’s the same for film. The days of people in power seeing and enjoying something, or sensing the potential based on instinct – well, that’s pretty much over. It’s a data-driven, Moneyball world.

DG: I hear ya! It is frustrating…the whole industry has put too much importance on the making of money instead of the making of quality work. It makes me sad. What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

DC: In 2010, I wrote a stage play called DESPERATE DOLLS. No one would make it – too violent, too weird, too controversial. A few close friends said it was unproduceable. I decided to make it into a film. Came close, but it collapsed. Because of the interest in the film, though, I met producer Anderson Lawfer (PONTYPOOL) and he mounted an excellent stage production in Chicago in 2014 that did great numbers. Google it, as a few wars were started over the show’s content. It was, however, my proudest moment, because it took so much pushing to get done. The final play that thrived was the exact script that I was told was unproduceable. Art is weird like that.
Oh, and I spoke at Comic-Con. That was fun.

DG: Wow, very cool on all of those things! Any advice you’d like to give newbies?

DC: I know so many people that create one film, or write one screenplay, and think, “Now I’m ready for the world!” It doesn’t work like that. It’s about a body of work. You keep going. Projects rise and fall – things catch and then die. I have released sixty-four records, knocked out a couple dozen screenplays, ten stage plays, scored a dozen movies, directed a bunch of shows, and only a cult handful has heard of me. But if I had stopped at just one or two projects, not only would the work kinda suck, but I wouldn’t have been able to explore all that artistic territory. As well, I wouldn’t always have irons in the fire. That can help you psychologically when you have a project die out. Well, you think, at least I have this other thing… Pivoting keeps your spirits up.

DG: Great advice! Anything else you’d like to say?

DC: Shriekfest and other LA-based competitions are important places to grow as a screenwriter. The Page Awards, Cinequest, or some others are great, too, as they give you the judge’s feedback, which allows you to tune your script. Attending is also wonderful networking. If you can afford the submission fees and the travel costs — do it! If you can’t afford it, start a GoFundMe page. I’ve never attended a SF where I didn’t meet someone who was interesting and could potentially help bring my work to a larger audience. I met a director in 2012 and she later landed a producing job at a major indie; now we’re working on bringing a female-driven haunted house picture to the screen. It might take years of friendship and networking, but if you think of it as “cool people working on a fun project” and not “convincing others” you’ll have success, and much more fun.
PS – My dream project is to remake THE MAN THEY COULD NOT HANG, a 1939 pic starring Boris Karloff. I have a great adaptation that would be massive.

DG: Thank you for the sweet words and I’m thrilled that you have collaborated with people you met at Shriekfest! That is my favorite part of the festival! And your adaptation sounds cool! ! It was great chatting Darren!

Robert J Rogers

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Robert J Rogers
2015 & 2017 screenplay finalist

DG: What is your name and company URL?

RR: Robert J. Rogers

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting?

RR: Screenwriter. (Actually I’m a storyteller that writes in screenplay format)

DG: 🙂 What are you currently working on?

RR: I have the bones for eight features ready to go. But I’m not going to finish anymore plays until I sell one of my five features.

DG: Wow! You’ve been busy! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

RR: On the storytelling side, Alistare MacLean. (The Guns of Navarone; Where Eagles Dare) On the screenplay side, Edmond North (The Day the Earth Stood Still) When it comes to SciFi, he was ahead of his time. So was Cyril Hume. (Forbidden Planet)

DG: Why do you think the horror/sci-fi genres have such a large following?

RR: First and foremost, I love SciFi. I’ve earned over eighty awards worldwide. Right now horror is a phenomenal genre. I’ve written a couple horror plays and have earned over seventy awards.

DG: Wow, that’s a lot of awards! Congrats! What do you love most about this business?

RR: It’s fun to win festivals all over the world.

DG: I bet! What do you dislike most about this business?

RR: I’ve earned over two hundred awards worldwide, and not a sniff from Hollywood

DG: That is a bit crazy! What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

RR: Met a ton of great people. I’m published. And all the awards.

DG: Any advice you’d like to give newbies?

RR: You’re a storyteller first, and screenwriter second. The only thing that will change this is if somebody walks out of a movie and utters,”I really hated the spelling in that movie.” (Chuckle)

DG: LOL Great advice! Anything else you’d like to say?

RR: Shotgun marketing doesn’t work. Carpet bomb a city, and analyze festival results. Good luck. Take care. Cherish time.

DG: I agree! Thank you Robert! It was great chatting!

Robert Rhyne

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Robert Rhyne
2015 & 2016 screenwriting finalist & 2017 Best Thriller Feature Screenplay for “Rational Panic”

DG: What is your name and company URL?

RR: Robert Rhyne. www.imdb.com/name/nm5526874.

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting?

RR: Screenwriting, primarily. And some production.

DG: What are you currently working on?

RR: I’m currently working on a new supernatural/horror feature spec and polishing a thriller spec.

DG: Nice! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

RR: The UCLA Theater, Film and Television (TFT) Screenwriting Program – both the teachers and students.

DG: Why do you think the horror/sci-fi genres have such a large following?

RR: Beneath the gore and the jump-scares, great horror, thrillers, and Sci-Fi movies trigger the survival instinct in all of us. What would you do to survive? How far would you go to save your family? These genres speak to the survival instinct, and allow us to vicariously experience the what if.

DG: What do you love most about this business?

RR: The unpredictability — you never know what will happen. There’s almost a gambling aspect to it.

DG: That is so very true! What do you dislike most about this business?

RR: Perhaps the late Tom Petty said it best: “The waiting is the hardest part”.

DG: So true! What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

RR: Several short films I’ve co-produced have won some Film Festival awards. And a screenplay I wrote, “The Intruder”, which just happened to be honored as a Shriekfest finalist in 2016, placed in another contest which published the screenplay as a book now available on Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

DG: That is wonderful news! Any advice you’d like to give newbies?

RR: Get professional advice on your screenplays from trusted coverage services or industry mentors. But remember that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. Don’t just listen to one reader’s comments. Make sure several readers echo the same concerns before spending weeks, or months, on a rewrite.

DG: Great advice! It’s so subjective at times. Anything else you’d like to say?

RR: Film Fests — like Shriekfest (the coolest!) — offer great networking opportunities. Enter and attend. Often.

DG: I agree! Thank you Robert! It was great chatting!

Winners 2017

Shriekfest 2017

Best Horror Feature Film:
Gnaw
directed by Haylar Garcia

Best Thriller Feature Film:
The Glass Coffin
directed by Haritz Zubillaga

Best Sci-Fi Feature Film:
Curvature
directed by Diego Hallivis

Best Horror Short Film:
Burn
directed by Judson Vaughan

Best Sci-Fi Short Film:
The Things They Left Behind
directed by Sara Werner

Best Super Short Film:
Classified
directed by Kevin McMahon & Andy Dylan

Best Horror Feature Screenplay:
The Heebies
written by Andrea D. McGee

Best Thriller Feature Screenplay:
Rational Panic
written by Robert Rhyne

Best Sci-Fi Feature Screenplay:
Remote
written by Marc Roussel

Best Short Screenplay:
Dark Hour
written by Edward Martin

Best Music Video:
Chainsaw
by Craven Band, directed by Erick Melchiorri

Best Commercial:
Scream Queen Wanted
directed by Shane Cole

Justin Kornmann

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Justin Kornmann
Producer of 2017 Official Selection “The Shift”

DG: What is your name and company URL?

JK: Picket Fence Entertainment, No URL at the moment.

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting?

JK: Filmmaking, specifically producing.

DG: What are you currently working on?

JK: Currently working on the latest draft of our next project which is in the horror genre.

DG: Nice! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

JK: I’ve been lucky enough to have several mentors who I have had the pleasure of working for. All of them have played an instrumental part in my growth as a producer. I’ve been able to learn from them while on the job while also being able to reach out to them on my own projects when I run into situations where I’m unsure on how to get the best result. I think every filmmaker needs a mentor. There is so much to learn in this business and there are many people out there who are willing to share their knowledge so you don’t have to learn everything by trial and error.

DG: I agree! Why do you think the horror/sci-fi genres have such a large following?

JK: I believe it’s because of the imagination that goes into those genres. There are always memorable lines, gruesome deaths, futuristic environments and situations that you can really put yourself in and then ask yourself what would I have done differently? We all are scared at one time or another and for horror films it’s a way to release those fears and live them without having to be chased by a psycho killer or some demonic force. With Sci-Fi, we all look to the future and are excited to see what type of technological advances may be on the horizon or we vision where our society will be in 10, 15, 20 years. It’s cool to possibly get a glimpse.

DG: What do you love most about this business?

JK: I love being able to play make believe for a living. We are literally getting paid to do something we did as children every day which is use our imagination.

DG: That is so very true! What do you dislike most about this business?

JK: For one, the uncertainty that goes into all of this can definitely take its toll. But I think what I dislike the most is how so many things are out of your control. You do what you need to do to get things going and then there is always the hurry up and wait game that happens and that can be brutal.

DG: I hear ya! It is frustrating. What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

JK: I’m most proud of completing my latest project. It’s always the latest completion. You learn so much from project to project and I feel you become a better filmmaker by every experience and you can take that with you for the next. So I’m proud of my latest accomplishment because it excites me to know I’ll be better on the next.

DG: I love that! It truly is a process and it’s exciting! Any advice you’d like to give newbies?

JK: If this is what you love to do, don’t let anything get in your way. Don’t give up, keep going. Ultimately if you continue to pursue your goals and persevere you will get things done. Then it all makes up for all the day jobs, rewrites, rejections, etc. You just have to want it bad enough to not give up.

DG: Great advice! thank you Justin, it was great chatting!

Michael Strode

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Michael Strode
Director of 2003’s Best Horror Short Film “Black Gulch”, 2007/2008/2014/2016 Screenplay Finalist, 2009/2015 Screenplay Semi-Finalist

DG: What is your name and company name and URL?

MS: Michael Strode.

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting? If filmmaking, which aspects?

MS: Both – I come from directing (MFA in Production at USC), and have focused on writing.

DG: What are you currently working on?

MS: ?I’m raising financing for Disturbed, a Blumhouse-style supernatural thriller (and Shriekfest screenplay finalist, thank you again) that inverts the traditional haunted house film. I’ve got key crew in place, talking to investors, and we’re looking to shoot next summer.

DG: ?That is awesome! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

MS: Kevin Chang is my good friend and sounding board. He’s been in development all over, most recently at Misher, and he gives great advice from that perspective.

DG: Why do you think the horror/scifi genres have such a large following?

MS: They offer satisfying catharsis. It’s a chance to see our fears magnified, exaggerated, and reflected back at us. We go on that ride, have the adrenaline rush in the confines of the theater or living room, then see those fears defeated. It’s a primal, fight-or-flight experience that allows us to process negativity or fear in a positive way.

DG: Well said! What do you love most about this business?

MS: The experience of watching something I’ve created with an audience. To see them react as you hoped is an incredible feeling.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

MS: The lack of professional courtesy that some people feel they can get away with.

DG: What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

MS: Tough to choose, but getting my first check for filmmaking is up there – being paid to create communal dreams is pretty great.

DG: Yes! Any advice you’d like to give to newbies?

MS: Everybody says this, but it truly is a marathon, not a sprint. The people who succeed are the people who don’t leave.

DG: Very true! Anything else you’d like to say?

MS: I look forward to bringing Disturbed back to Shriekfest as a feature!

DG: Oh Michael, I so look forward to that! When I was compiling your history with Shriekfest above, I was shocked at how many years I’ve had the pleasure of seeing your work! I’m so very proud of all that you have done!

Robert J. Sexton

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Robert J. Sexton
Filmmaker, Producer, Director

DG: What is your name and company URL?

RS: Robert J. Sexton, Hollywoodasylum.com

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting?

RS: Prime Mover / Vision-Thing. That’s what my business card says at least. HA! Filmmaker. Producer. Director. Throw in a bit of screenwriting and anything else that needs to get the show completed.

DG: What are you currently working on?

RS: I just produced/directed a 360° VR video horror short, PSYCHO CITY, TX. – VR.
It’s an interstitial to a 2D episodic project that I’m currently in preproduction on. People are going to go crazy for Psycho City, TX.

DG: That sounds cool!! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

RS: The list of filmmakers who inspire me is endless, but off the top of my head…
Stanley Kubrick, for all of his work and for faking the moon landing. The storytelling acumen of Orson Welles. Mario Bava for the obvious. Terry Gilliam for whimsy and depiction of life’s absurdities. Alejandro Jodorowsky, for fever dreams. Jean Rollin’s, for scaring me and making me horny at the same time.

DG: Why do you think the horror/sci-fi genres have such a large following?

RS: People have a primordial need for stimulation and excitement. The audience needs to receive outside stimulus that is not user/self generated.
Fear, dread, anxiety, terror… Horror movies deliver that in controlled, manageable doses. The audience knows there is an escape. It’s safe.
That’s what I’m digging about my experiments in VR filmmaking. There is no safeword. There is no shelter. There is no way out.

DG: EEK! What do you love most about this business?

RS: Eliciting reactions from the audience.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

RS: 1) People who talk about producing movies but don’t actually produce anything.
2) Going to to lunch with said people.
3) When the aforementioned don’t pick up the tab.

DG: What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

RS: I really enjoy pushing buttons and envelopes. Virtual reality is allowing me to do things in a narrative environment that haven’t been done before. It’s a very exciting time in cinematic history.

DG: yes, it is! Any advice you’d like to give newbies?

RS: Steal from the best and make it your own.

DG: Anything else you’d like to say?

RS: Check out my latest work, It’s not for the squeamish or the pure of heart.
What does not kill you, makes you stranger…
Download Psycho City, TX – VR and get the free VR app for Android and IOS .
http://www.bit.do/shoot_pctx
MUST have VR headset and earphones for the proper experience.
Keep watching the skies…