Ray Kermani

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Ray Kermani
Writer, Director and Screenwriter

Ray Kermani

DG: What is your name and company name and URL?

Ray Kermani, Shadow Pictures

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting? If filmmaking, which aspects?

Film director and screenwriter of short films. I really like to direct my own screenplays.

DG: What are you currently working on?

At this moment, I’m working on three new horror short films. “Ghost Bloggers”, “S.O.S. Monsters” and “Bad Moon.”

DG: Who do you consider your mentor and why?

Being a huge fan of John Carpenter and Sam Raimi I kind of consider these two directors as my mentors. I admire Carpenter’s pefect atmospheric scenes as well as his way of storytelling. Raimi on the other hand, is a master of camera work and sound design. He knows how to create a compelling viewing experience.

DG: Why do you think the horror/scifi genres have such a large following?

Basically, we all love to be scared or just be intrigued by the “unknown”. Whether it’s by a story or a film.

DG: What do you love most about this business?

The thing I love the most about this business, is the fact you get to meet new people. The US festivals have always been so good and generous to me. I’m very grateful to be recognized in America.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

I live in Belgium and that is probably one of the worst countries as a horror filmmaker to live in. Horror and scifi are definitely not popular over here. Luckily, my movies are being very well received outside of Belgium.

DG: What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

Right now, I’m promoting disability in horror. There’s just not enough diversity in horror and scifi films. We’re all the same people on this planet and it’s no effort for filmmakes at all to work with everybody, no matter what your ethnicity, gender, disability or religion is.

DG: Any advice you’d like to give to newbies?

Get yourself surrounded by passionate and ambitious people who elevate your film to a higher level. Make as much as short films as you can. Consider making short films as your learning school. You’ll sure make mistakes, but mistakes make you only a better filmmaker.

Dave Bundtzen Test

DG: What is your name and company name and URL?

DB: My name is Dave Bundtzen. My company is Flix Digital. All of my horror short films are available at my YouTube Channel Flix Horrorhttps://www.youtube.com/c/FlixHorror

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting? If filmmaking, which aspects?

DB: I am a writer, producer and director.

DG: What are you currently working on?

DB: am prepping a new horror short film titled Widow Maker. I hope to premiere it at Shriekfest next year.

DG: Nice! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

DB: I have had many mentors over the years so I could not name just one. I find that mentors suddenly become available at the exact point I need them. It’s funny but it has happened time and time again. I am always so thankful for their guidance and insight.

DG::I love that! Why do you think the horror/scifi genres have such a large following?

DB: I think of all genres horror has always been considered the red headed step child. Films in the past have been done for lower budgets and without major star power. Film critics usually dislike horror films as a rule. Yet the audience over the years accepts this and loves them. The audience for horror is very passionate. This is why I love it so much too. I have made other genre films, from comedy, drama etc, but horror is always the most fun and I love to watch the films with an audience.

DG: What do you love most about this business?

DB: Making the impossible happen. Creating a story in your head and then down the road seeing it play with an audience is an amazing experience. I love it.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

DB: Egos. I am not a fan. I try to work with cast and crew that leave their egos at the door. Egos just get in the way of the process for me.

DG: What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

DB: I have built my career on always learning, being a good person, working hard and having fun while doing it all.

DG: Any advice you’d like to give to newbies?

DB: We are in the best stage ever to be a filmmaker. Make movies often and post them for feedback. You will be amazed by what you can learn and the vast audience that you can reach.

DG: Anything else you’d like to say?

DB: I want to thank Shriekfest for the amazing opportunities it has brought to me. I am so thankful that I have been a part of the festival. Thank you!

DG: Dave, the pleasure is all mine! Thank you for chatting!

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Dave Bundtzen

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Dave Bundtzen
Writer, Producer and Director

Dave Bundtzen

DG: What is your name and company name and URL?

DB: My name is Dave Bundtzen. My company is Flix Digital. All of my horror short films are available at my YouTube Channel Flix Horrorhttps://www.youtube.com/c/FlixHorror

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting? If filmmaking, which aspects?

DB: I am a writer, producer and director.

DG: What are you currently working on?

DB: am prepping a new horror short film titled Widow Maker. I hope to premiere it at Shriekfest next year.

DG: Nice! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

DB: I have had many mentors over the years so I could not name just one. I find that mentors suddenly become available at the exact point I need them. It’s funny but it has happened time and time again. I am always so thankful for their guidance and insight.

DG::I love that! Why do you think the horror/scifi genres have such a large following?

DB: I think of all genres horror has always been considered the red headed step child. Films in the past have been done for lower budgets and without major star power. Film critics usually dislike horror films as a rule. Yet the audience over the years accepts this and loves them. The audience for horror is very passionate. This is why I love it so much too. I have made other genre films, from comedy, drama etc, but horror is always the most fun and I love to watch the films with an audience.

DG: What do you love most about this business?

DB: Making the impossible happen. Creating a story in your head and then down the road seeing it play with an audience is an amazing experience. I love it.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

DB: Egos. I am not a fan. I try to work with cast and crew that leave their egos at the door. Egos just get in the way of the process for me.

DG: What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

DB: I have built my career on always learning, being a good person, working hard and having fun while doing it all.

DG: Any advice you’d like to give to newbies?

DB: We are in the best stage ever to be a filmmaker. Make movies often and post them for feedback. You will be amazed by what you can learn and the vast audience that you can reach.

DG: Anything else you’d like to say?

DB: I want to thank Shriekfest for the amazing opportunities it has brought to me. I am so thankful that I have been a part of the festival. Thank you!

DG: Dave, the pleasure is all mine! Thank you for chatting!

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Sara Caldwell

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Sara Caldwell
2019 Feature Screenplay Finalist with “Raven Dock”

Sara Caldwell

DG: What is your name and company name and URL?

SC: Sara Caldwell House of Gorey Productions, http://www.houseofgoreyproductions.com

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting? If filmmaking, which aspects?

SC: I’m primarily a producer/writer but have also directed short films and worked as a 2nd A.D.

DG: What are you currently working on?

SC: I’m working as a producer on a new online series called Moms N Tots that will begin airing in spring 2020. I also just completed a new horror screenplay, Mother, Maiden and Crone. Yes it involves a witch!

DG: Nice! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

SC: My father, who showed me that you can succeed as a writer and live an independent life without the 9-5 shackles of a traditional job.

DG: Why do you think the horror/scifi genres have such a large following?

SC: It’s one of the few genres that’s always blossomed in the independent world and star power isn’t necessary for its success, so filmmakers can afford to go there. People also love to be scared – it’s cathartic as long as it’s safe.

DG: What do you love most about this business?

SC: The creative and collaborative aspects – it’s so much fun to be on set, all focused toward the same goal.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

SC: It’s highly competitive and risky. I’ve seen many of my former students really struggle in the real world and some give up because it’s just too tough financially.

DG: Very sad. What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

SC: Getting into the WGA certainly made me proud, as well as having four books published over the years. Also, becoming a lecturer in Film & Media Studies at UC Santa Barbara has been a fantastic experience.

DG: Wow! That’s impressive! Any advice you’d like to give to newbies?

SC: Find your own voice. To quote Oscar Wilde, “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”

DG: Yes!!! Anything else you’d like to say?

SC: Thanks for hosting such an awesome film festival!

DG: Thank you Sara for your kind words and being in the Shriekfest family!

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Susan McCauley

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Susan McCauley
Writer/Producer of 2019 Official Selection “The Murdering Kind”

Susan McCauley

DG: What is your name and company name and URL?

SM: I write indie films and I write novels and short stories that have been published by different companies. My website is www.sbmccauley.com.

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting? If filmmaking, which aspects?

SM: I’m a screenwriter and fiction writer. I mainly focus on the genres of horror, supernatural, and dark fantasy (for adults and kids).

DG: What are you currently working on?

SM: I have two feature films in development: The Murdering Kind and Forsaken. My second novel will be released worldwide in February 2020.

DG: I’m so excited that The Murdering Kind will be a feature now! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

SM: My mentor was the British theatre and television director Robin Midgley. Sadly, Robin passed away in 2007. However, in the years I knew him, he was a tremendous guide and support to me and my writing. Even when I wasn’t on the right track with what I was doing, he understood what I was after and was able to help nudge me in the right direction. He really “got” me as an artist. I miss him greatly.

DG: Wow, he sounds amazing. Why do you think the horror/scifi genres have such a large following?

SM: I think there is a long answer to this questions, but, in general, I think the biggest reason is that horror and sci-fi gives us a safe opportunity to feel scared. In the expanse of human evolution we were naturally in survival situations on a regular basis. Since the industrial revolution and the modernization of the world (especially with advances in medicine, technology, and engineering), we don’t use those fight-or-flight responses as often, which is what our bodies were designed to do. So, I think being able to see horror, sci-fi, and even action films (or read books) in a “safe” setting is a way for us to feel those natural feelings, which we need, without being in any real danger.

DG: What do you love most about this business?

SM: I love the ability to create and work with talented people.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

SM: The sharks. Those who take (or try to take), but aren’t able to contribute in a meaningful way.

DG: What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

SM: I guess I’m pretty happy about the recent release of my debut novel, The Devil’s Tree, which came out in October 2019. It’s been doing well and getting a good response from readers. So, I’m very happy about that.

DG: Congrats!!Any advice you’d like to give to newbies?

SM: If you’re a writer – read as much as you can and write. Just keep doing it. Take classes and get to know good people who can lift you up. It can be a very discouraging business (in film and fiction). There is SO MUCH rejection. You need to remind yourself that if you keep working at it you will get better and better (I hope and pray that I will get better at writing every day and with every project for the rest of my life). You also need to remember that what you write or create as a filmmaker will NOT be for everyone. There will always be some “haters” out there. There will always be people who don’t love the genres you do. For me, if I’m able to create something that I’m truly happy with and that the majority of viewers or readers enjoy, then I think I’m on the right track with what I’m doing.

DG: Excellent advice! Anything else you’d like to say?

SM: I hope you’ll stop by my website or visit me on social media and say hi.

DG: Thank you Susan for chatting!

Avishai Weinberger

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Avishai Weinberger
2016 and 2019 Screenplay Finalist

Avishai Weinberger

DG: What is your name and company name and URL?

AW: My name is Avishai Weinberger. I do not have a company, but my twitter account is @avishaiw.

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting? If filmmaking, which aspects?

AW: I’m largely a screenwriter, but I also direct and edit.

DG: What are you currently working on?

AW: I’m currently working on taking my feature script THIRD DATE (Shriekfest 2019 finalist), a horror story about toxic love, and getting it off the ground. I have a producer attached and I plan on directing. The goal is to shoot in June if possible. I’m also writing a couple of projects at the side that are in too early a stage of development to discuss right now, but I’m excited to see where they go.

DG: Who do you consider your mentor and why?

AW: Oh, boy, hard question. I’ve been blessed with a variety of mentors, from my time at NYU to various experiences at writers retreats and festivals. If I had to choose one, I’d probably say my screenwriting professor John Warren, who kept me (and my peers) honest with our projects, and without whom I don’t know if I would have completed WOLFSBANE (Shriekfest 2016 finalist), a script which opened many doors for me.

DG::Why do you think the horror/scifi genres have such a large following?

AW: I have all sorts of theories as to why these genres are important psychologically, but as for a large following… I think it has something to do with the fact that they’re transgressive. Sci-fi is about exploring far-out ideas, and horror is about exploring negative emotions. And in the process of exploring these things, we cross lines with regards to what’s realistic, how we treat other people, etc. To some people, those lines ought not to be crossed, and art that goes there doesn’t deserve respect. And to us genre fans, crossing those lines gives us a thrill. We like “going there”, and the question of respectability makes us feel like we own the genre. More than once, I’ve heard genre fans describe themselves as misfits and outsiders, and I think the association with sometimes-taboo stories increases that feeling of specialness. I also think that with horror (and, to an extent, sci-fi), you can expect art every time, regardless of the quality of the story.

DG: What do you love most about this business?

AW: THE PEOPLE. Always the people. I’ve bonded with so many new friends over storytelling, movies that feel personal to us, and shared experiences in the trenches.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

AW: The barrier for entry. I’m privileged– I don’t have to worry about rent or where my next meal comes from, and I can afford to produce films and fly to LA and attend festivals and go to writers retreats and all these various things that cost money. A lot of very talented people don’t have that privilege, and it takes them longer to get where they deserve to be in their careers.

DG: What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

AW: I made my short film THIRD DATE (which the feature script is based on). That was a lot of blood, sweat, and tears, and seeing it come out the way I’d hoped, as well as seeing it embraced by so many people, always swells my heart.

DG: Any advice you’d like to give to newbies?

AW: First off, the obvious: Keep writing, keep making things. Don’t expect to be perfect, but the more things you make, the more you’ll know for the next one. But deeper than that, I want to address the way people take notes. I see it with newbies a lot, and it’s totally understandable: A note can feel like an attack, and you might feel the urge to defend your artistic choices. Resist the urge to do that. Remember that notes come from an honest place, and the person giving notes wants nothing more than to help you. If you don’t like the note, just thank the note-giver for their time and simply don’t take the note. That’s valid– It’s your project. But do listen to the notes. If enough people give you one specific criticism, it’s probably worth investigating ways to patch that problem up. Try an edit, see what happens. If you vibe with the change, keep it. If not, don’t. No skin off your back.

DG: Anything else you’d like to say?

AW: Horror people are some of the nicest people I’ve met, and I met a lot of them at Shriekfest. Viva Shriekfest.

Jamal Hodge

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Jamal Hodge
2018 & 2019 Screenplay Finalist

DG: What is your name and company name and URL?

JH: My name is Jamal Hodge and my company name is Hodge House Cinema, you can check me out at www.directorhodge.com and my Instagram is @directorh

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting? If filmmaking, which aspects?

JH: The truth is both. I’m a director, writer, and producer in that order. Directing is what I want to be remembered for when I die, Writing is what I do for the love, and producing is what I’m good at that I can do to help others.

DG: I love that! What are you currently working on?

JH: Right now we have 8 projects in development. I’m a Producer on an animated feature film called ‘Pierre The Pigeon Hawk’, I have a feature film version of my award winning short film Knockout Game in development, and a horror movie based on a Bram Stoker Award winning poem called Mourning Meal that we are submitting to the best festivals in the game like Shriekfest itself. The mourning meal script was a finalist at Shriekfest in 2018 and won the NYC Horror Film Festival 2018

DG: Wow, that’s great! You’ve been busy! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

JH: My writing mentor is Linda Addison, the most decorated black female poet & short story writer in the game. I grew up reading her in dark matter and was like one day she will teach me everything she knows!! Lol
In Television it’s Diana Sperazza she is a executive producer at Discovery Channel and is one of the female pioneers in journalism, her wisdom and bluntness is unparalleled, but also her generosity.
My only male mentor is dead. Luckily he left an epic body of work and a philosophy concerning cinematic suspense and mood that I live by. Alfred Hitchcock.

DG::Nice! Why do you think the horror/scifi genres have such a large following?

JH: Honesty. Horror is the last genre where the creator can be as completely provocative, offensive, and savage as he or she wants. It lends itself to both entertainment & truth in a way no other genre can. Audiences appreciate that. It’s a safe space to be primal, to be hurt, to be afraid, to see behind the veil.
Sci-fi I believe gives us a future. It’s is prophecy in many ways, but also shines a mirror on both the past and the present by displaying those parts of our nature that time will never change and then either celebrating it or cautioning us to weary.

DG: Well said! What do you love most about this business?

JH: The awards of course. Nah, lol, seriously? The work itself. The collaborative nature of the art form, the discovery of the moment. It is a series of revelations that take form in manifestations that can be enjoyed by millions.
Collective alchemy.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

JH: People. 😆 Aren’t they the best and worse thing about everything?

DG: Ha ha…sometimes! What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

JH: That’s a loaded question. There’s many that I hold dear. My top 3 would be going to Cannes twice in the last 3 years for my short films The Kind Ones and Knockout Game, winning twice at The NYC Horror Film Festival, and directing the entire first season of Primal Instinct on Investigation Discovery.

DG: Congrats! Any advice you’d like to give to newbies?

JH: If you’re going to do this you will have to forfeit a normal life and embrace a path of pain and uncertainty, of perpetual pregnancy. Money and success will ease this slightly, but creation is inherently painful and uncertain. That will never change.
Be courageous, constantly learn everything you can, learn to love broken people, and most of all maintain a personal standard no matter the circumstances.
You’ve chosen a hard life, but one with the ultimate reward: the projection of your inner divinity into other hearts and minds.

DG: Wow, well said! Anything else you’d like to say?

JH: I think I’ve said enough.

DG: LOL Thank you Jamal! It was great chatting and I love having you in the Shriekfest family!

Travis Heermann

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Travis Heermann
2018 & 2019 Screenplay Finalist

DG: What is your name and company URL?

TH: Travis Heermann. My author page is www.travisheermann.com

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting?

TH: At this point, screenwriting, but I’m hoping to produce and direct a short over the next year or so.

DG: Nice! What are you currently working on?

TH: Right now, all of my immediate projects are fiction. Just finished a novel edit, getting ready to start a new novel series, and doing some ghostwriting. I’m also percolating a script for the short film I’d like to make next year.

DG: Busy guy! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

TH: I have a few notable mentors, writers Kevin J. Anderson, Dean Wesley Smith, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, and James Artimus Owen. None have yet emerged on the filmmaking side, but I feel like I’m only beginning to venture into that.

DG: Why do you think the horror/sci-fi genres have such a large following?

TH: Because they allow people to step outside of the real world and experience things that are beyond their humdrum lives. In the case of horror in particular, it’s like riding a roller coaster. It’s scary, but you know you’re safe. You’re pretty sure you’ll leave the theater alive.

DG: What do you love most about this business?

TH: Right now, it is the companionship of passionate people. Filmmaking requires a level of drive, ambition, and determination that few other occupations can match. I hope soon to have the experience of watching one of my stories come to life on the screen, but that hasn’t happened yet.

DG: It will happen soon, don’t give up!! What do you dislike most about this business?

TH: How soul-crushing it can be. In the publishing industry, you will at least receive a rejection, even if it’s a form letter. The film industry doesn’t even offer that simple courtesy. This bleeds over into the general flakiness of so many people involved.
Me: *delivers a heartfelt pitch*
Rep: Oh, wow, that sounds amazing!
Me: So can I send it to you?
Rep: Next!
It all seems incredibly disingenuous, and makes me wonder how anyone accomplishes anything they didn’t do 100% themselves.

DG: It can be frustrating! What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

TH: In screenwriting, it’s the awards my scripts have garnered this year. I have two super-cool trophies from GenreBlast and Crimson Screen Film Festival, and a cool plaque from the Famous Monsters Silver Scream Festival, and several other finalist placements to crow about. It encourages persistence.

DG: Congrats! Any advice you’d like to give newbies?

TH: As I’m still very much a newbie in the screenwriting/filmmaking realm, I don’t know that it would be worth much, except I am a professional author, so I know how a story works, and why. One of the deficiencies I see fairly often in film festival short films is a lack of understanding about what constitutes a story. Many times a short film is a just a vignette, or an intro. It doesn’t have a beginning, middle, and end, or sometimes it doesn’t have a plot that makes sense, or characters that feel real. I think this is why filmmaking is such a difficult art form. It requires SO MANY disparate skills.

DG: Anything else you’d like to say?

TH: If you’re a horror or sci-fi screenwriter, submit to Shriekfest. It’s a gem.

DG: Aww, thank you Travis! It was great chatting!

Mark Renshaw

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Mark Renshaw
2014 and 2015 Semi Finalist, 2017 and 2018 Finalist, 2019 Quarter Finalist, Finalist, & Best Short Screenplay “Ganglers”

DG: What is your name and company name and URL?

MR: Mark Renshaw – www.mark-renshaw.com

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting? If filmmaking, which aspects?

MR: Screenwriting, plus I write prose and dabble in producing.

DG: What are you currently working on?

MR: I am adapting the Cyborn feature screenplay which was in the Shriekfest finals into a novel. The first draft should be complete by Christmas.

DG: Wow, that’s impressive! Who do you consider your mentor and why?

MR: This may seem an odd answer but there is a website called Simply Scripts which has a forum for screenplay writers. We are encouraged to upload our scripts there for peer reviews and I pretty much owe most of my writing development to the guys who frequent that place.

DG: That is amazing! Why do you think the horror/scifi genres have such a large following?

MR: People want an escape from the norm. Horror and sci-fi may include characters and elements we all identify with, but they definitely are not the norm. They are a safe way to experience the extraordinary.

DG: What do you love most about this business?

MR: The creative side. At the end of the day, this is all about telling stories. Collaborating on a creative endeavor is so fulfilling.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

MR: The business side. The business element treats the work as a commodity and what it can do for people personally in terms of wealth, notoriety etc. rather than what is best for the story.

DG: What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

MR: This is more of a hobby for me until the day I can turn it into my day job, but so far I’m proud that some of my stories have been published, some scripts produced and I’ve won competitions that have taken me to Pinewood Studios, the Houses of Parliament and wonderful venues such as the Nashville film festival.

DG: That’s Wonderful! Any advice you’d like to give to newbies?

MR: Keep writing, keep on getting your work out there and seeking honest but constructive feedback. Learn from it and improve. Rinse and repeat.

DG: yep! Anything else you’d like to say?

MR: Time is the fire in which we burn. If you are waiting for something to happen, all you are doing is burning time. Be brave, go out there and make something happen.

DG: I love it! thank you Mark! It was great chatting! I hope you and yours have a Happy Holiday season!

Stephen Kayfish

SHRIEKFEST INTERVIEW

Stephen Kayfish
2017 Quarter Finalist, 2018 Finalist & Semi Finalist, and 2019 Quarter Finalist & Finalist with “The Craving”

DG: What is your name and company URL?

SK: Stephen Kayfish

DG: What is your specialty…filmmaking or screenwriting?

SK: Screenwriter

DG: What are you currently working on?

SK: Currently I have 2 feature screenplays in the works, the first is a political thriller about an ancient evil force who takes the form of a U.S. President. The second is about a young bullied boy who is pushed to the limit of exacting bloody revenge on those who have wronged him.

DG: Who do you consider your mentor and why?

SK: I’ve followed the three stooges religiously all my life (John Carpenter, Wes Craven, Tobe Hooper)

DG: Why do you think the horror/sci-fi genres have such a large following?

SK: I think most people like them for the same reason I do, they’re fun, they’re a roller coaster ride of emotions, and they’re ballsy.

DG What do you love most about this business?

SK: I love the idea of creating something out of nothing and I love people are passionate about the art in which they create.

DG: What do you dislike most about this business?

SK: People who are fake or who are not authentic. Honesty and passion are a necessity in my opinion.

DG: I agree! What career accomplishment are you most proud of?

SK: Winning the grand prize at Film Empire and being a finalist at Shriekfest among other screenwriting competitions in the U.S. and abroad. I’m from Edmonton, Canada and it feels great to be acknowledged outside of the country. Now I have to work on a getting a script optioned 😉

DG: It will happen! Any advice you’d like to give newbies?

SK: There is no formula to success just hard work and perseverance. Learn to love the art and craft of filmmaking and take whatever opportunity you’re given no matter what, big or small. Oh and finish your projects if you’re a writer. You must finish!

DG: Great advice! Anything else you’d like to say?

SK: Thank you again to Denise and team for this interview and giving us nobodys a place to showcase our work. There is a lot of closed doors in this business.

DG: You aren’t a nobody Stephen! Thank you for sharing your tips! It was great chatting!